Flickinger Sutterfield & Boulton

Social Networking for Drivers?

February 16, 2014 — by Mark T. Flickinger, JD
Tags:

With the extreme popularity of social networking, it should come as no surprise that a San Diego company has developed an application to connect people to each other-while they're driving. Bump.com promises that drivers across the country can connect to each other using e-mails, texts and voice mail, all through a scan of their license plates. Security cameras on the roads take photos of license plates. The program scans and recognizes license plate numbers and matches them with e-mail accounts, mobile phones and location systems so that people are able to communicate. Even if an individual has no interest in being a part of Bump.com's network, his or her license plate will be scanned if its image is captured. The program will then assign it an identity. If the individual doesn't sign up for the network, he or she won't receive any text or voice messages. Those who want the service will pay a nominal yearly fee. The initiative will operate as a membership program,

Read More

Innovative continuous flow intersections improve driving in Utah

February 2, 2014 — by Mark T. Flickinger, JD
Tags:

Utah is quickly becoming a leader in the use of continuous flow intersections, known as CFIs, to cost effectively improve driving safety and congestion. In 2007, Salt Lake City became home to the fourth continuous flow intersection in the United States. Since then, a total of seven CFIs have been constructed along Bangerter Highway, with plans for an additional four CFIs to be built in 2013. How CFIs differ from traditional intersections CFIs improve traffic conditions by eliminating the left-turn phase required by traditional intersections. During the left turn phase, all other traffic must remain stopped at an intersection while cars turning left are allowed to turn left through green arrows. CFIs eliminate this phase by creating special left turn lanes for cars to enter prior to reaching the main intersection. Cars in the special turn lanes wait at an additional midblock stop light until they are allowed to proceed simultaneously with the traffic going straight. Although

Read More

Identifying and avoiding aggressive driving and road rage

February 1, 2014 — by Mark T. Flickinger, JD
Tags:

Road rage is a termed coined by a television news station in response to several incidents of freeway shootings in the 1990s. Many have expanded the term to encompass all forms of aggressive driving. However, while both aggressive driving and road rage are dangerous, there are differences between the two. Utah motorists should be aware of what aggressive driving and road rage are, the extent of the problem of these behaviors and how to avoid aggressive drivers and prevent auto accidents . What is the difference between road rage and aggressive driving? The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's definition of aggressive driving is the operation of a motor vehicle in a manner that endangers or is likely to endanger persons or property. Some examples of aggressive driving include speeding, sudden and unsignaled lane changes, following other vehicles too closely, driving too fast for the road conditions, ignoring traffic control signals, frequently honking car horn

Read More